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Vitamin E: Where To Find It

Vitamin E: where to find it

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Vitamin E is already well known for healthy aging. But protecting our skin against pollution or sun is not its only advantage: Vitamin E is also very important for our immune system.

Key takeaways

  1. It helps maintain healthy skin and eyes and a healthy immune system
  2. Vitamin E can be found in nuts and seeds, avocado, spinach, kale, eggs and plant oils, such as olive oil
  3. Vitamin E can be stored in the body so there’s no need to consume it every day

 

Why do we need vitamin E?

Vitamin E is essential for health and well-being because it’s a powerful antioxidant, meaning that it helps protect the body against free radicals and environmental damage such as cigarette smoke, pollution or too much sun. It helps maintain healthy skin and eyes. Vitamin E also plays an essential role for the immune system, preventing the invasion of bacteria and viruses.

 

What foods are the best sources of Vitamin E?

Sources include nuts and seeds, avocado, spinach, kale, eggs and plant oils, such as olive oil.

 

How much do I need?

The recommended intake of Vitamin E for an adult is 3 to 4 mg per day. That’s a handful of almonds or a tablespoon of olive oil over your salad. Easy! Also, considering that your body is able to store Vitamin E for future use, do not worry about having to consume it every day.

If you are considering taking supplements, do not exceed 540 mg of Vitamin E per day. Check with your doctor beforehand, especially if you have a particular blood condition as an excess of Vitamin E supplements, due to an anticoagulant effect, as it can increase the risk of bleeding.

 

What are the symptoms of a deficiency?

Deficiencies are very rare but include muscle weakness and vision problems. Only rare disorders involving a problematic fat absorption can cause a dangerous lack of Vitamin E (Crohn’s disease or cystic fibrosis). Symptoms such as muscle weakness, loss of body movement control or vision problems can occur.

 

Did you know?

Like Vitamins A and D, Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin, which means it’s absorbed better if consumed with a meal containing fat. It can be stored in the body so there’s no need to consume every day.

 

 

Work Cited:

Rimm, Stampfer, Acherio et al (1993), Vitamin E consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease in men, The New England Journal of Medicine

Stampfer, Hennekens, Manson et al (1993), Vitamin E consumption and the risk of coronary disease in women, The New England Journal of Medicine

Pallast, Schouten, de Waart et al (1999), Effect Of 50- And 100-mg Vitamin E Supplements On Cellular Immune Function In Noninstitutionalized Elderly Persons, The American journal of clinical nutrition

Meydani, Meydani, Rall et al (1994), Assessment Of The Safety Of High-dose, Short-term Supplementation With Vitamin E In Healthy Older Adults, The American journal of clinical nutrition

Meydani, Meydani, Blumberg et al (1997), Vitamin E Supplementation And In Vivo Immune Response In Healthy Elderly Subjects. A Randomized Controlled Trial, Jama

Meydani, Barklund, Liu et al (1997), Vitamin E Supplementation Enhances Cell-mediated Immunity In Healthy Elderly Subjects, The American journal of clinical nutrition

Penn, Purkins, Kelleher et al (1991), The effect of dietary supplementation with vitamins A, C and E on cell-mediated immune function in elderly long-stay patients: a randomized controlled trial, Age and Ageing

Meydani (2000), Effect of functional food ingredients: vitamin E modulation of cardiovascular diseases and immune status in the elderly, The American journal of clinical nutrition

Lee, Cook, Gaziano et al (2005), Vitamin E in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer: the Women’s Health Study: a randomized controlled trial, Jama

Renfan Xu, Shasha Zhang, Anyu Tao, Guangzhi Chen,  and Muxun Zhang (2014), Influence of Vitamin E Supplementation on Glycaemic Control: A Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials, PLoS One

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